Modern Talking – You’re My Heart, You’re My Soul

Modern Talking – You’re My Heart, You’re My Soul

 Modern Talking – You’re My Heart, You’re My Soul

 

 

for Best Selling German Band at the World Music Awards that year. The follow-up album Alone also went straight to number one in Germany and was very successful elsewhere; the album managed to sell over one million units in Europe alone.

Bohlen and Anders followed the 1980s Modern Talking pattern as they chose to release two singles from each album, as in the past. A series of singles and four more albums followed such as Year of the Dragon, America, Victory and Universe. After reaching the point where they had already collected over 400 gold and platinum awards worldwide, Bohlen and Anders decided to split up again in 2003 just before the release of another of their album compiled of best-songs. The second break-up seemed to have been triggered mainly from the negative portrayal of Anders by Bohlen written in his autobiographical book published on 4 October 2003. In the course of all the disputes which eventually drove the duo to its break-up, Bohlen was involved in Deutschland sucht den Superstar (DSDS), the German edition of the UK’s Pop Idol. The compilation album was released in 2003 entitled “The Final Album” which contained all of the duo’s singles. Thomas Anders started another solo career immediately after the end of Modern Talking, while Bohlen had by now begun devoting most of his time to new talents, especially those he discovered on DSDS.

Production and sales figures

In 1984, Bohlen cited the hit single “Precious Little Diamond” (by Fox the Fox), as his inspiration for using falsetto choruses. The studio vocal line up of Rolf Köhler, Michael Scholz, Detlef Wiedeke and (on early albums) Birger Corleis, in addition to Bohlen and Anders, produced the high choruses characteristic of Modern Talking.[10] Köhler, Scholz and Wiedeke later went on to work with Bohlen in Blue System, before joining with songwriter Thomas Widrat to form Systems in Blue. Köhler, Scholz and Wiedeke were never credited on the Modern Talking albums, and eventually went to court over the matter. They received an out of court settlement and Bohlen published a sleeve note for his next release (Obsession, by Blue System), acknowledging the trio’s contribution.

Further influences include German-language Schlager music, disco pop (Bee Gees) and romantic English-language songs of Italian and French origin, like Gazebo’s “I Like Chopin”. After the 1998 reunion, Bohlen produced Eurodance as well as American-style MOR ballads.

Global sales of Modern Talking, after the duo’s second and final break-up in 2003, had reached 120 million singles and albums combined, making them the biggest-selling German music act in history.

Dieter Bohlen also composed for other artists while still in Modern Talking, such as for Chris Norman and Smokie, whose song “Midnight Lady” (1986) remains Bohlen’s most popular composition. He also composed a large number of disco tracks for C. C. Catch, using an accelerated, less-romantic sound. Some English Bohlen songs such as “You’re My Heart, You’re My Soul” were also recorded with German lyrics by Mary Roos, using the same playback tracks. When Modern Talking split up in 1987, a number of tracks written for the last album were re-arranged and then transferred onto Bohlen’s first solo album by Blue System. Modern Talking’s sixth album was released about the same time as the first single from Blue System, “Sorry Little Sarah”, where Bohlen competed on the charts against Modern Talking’s “In 100 Years” hit song.

Solo careers

In 2006, Bohlen included a secret message in his song “Bizarre Bizarre” when played backwards: “There will never be an end to Modern Talking”. Bohlen’s response: “I meant to say that the music of Modern Talking will live forever”. Anders has kept the Modern Talking songs in his repertoire and produced songs in a similar vein for his solo records (“Independent Girl”). In 2006, he produced an album Songs Forever of swing and jazz versions of popular songs (including Modern Talking’s first hit). Bohlen has written two autobiographical books about Modern Talking’s history from his perspective. The first book sold a million copies in Germany. The sequel was heavily criticised for his unfairness towards the people he worked with. As a result of that, Bohlen withdrew from the public for a year until 2006, when he said he regretted putting out the second book. Anders had not been the only one pressing charges against Bohlen and demanding that sections of the book be modified. Frank Farian was also angered by Bohlen’s literary output and released a book in which he tried to expose Bohlen as a fraud. Bohlen’s first book was the basis of an animated comedy film called Dieter: Der Film. The soundtrack of this film contains the previously unreleased Modern Talking song “Shooting Star” which had been written for the Universe album.
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